Easy time-management tips

Whether it’s in your job or your lifestyle as a whole, learning how to manage your time effectively will help you feel more relaxed, focused and in control.

 

Strategies on using time:
These applications of time management have proven to be effective as good study habits.As we go through each strategy, note down an idea of what each will look like for you:

Work out your goals

“Work out who you want to be, your priorities in life, and what you want to achieve in your career or personal life,” “That is then the guiding principle for how you spend your time and how you manage it.”

Once you have worked out the big picture, you can then work out some short-term and medium-term goals. “Knowing your goals will help you plan better and focus on the things that will help you achieve those goals,”

Make a list

To-do lists are a good way to stay organised. “Try it and see what works best for you,” Always  prefers to keep a single to-do list, to avoid losing track of multiple lists. “Keeping a list will help you work out your priorities and timings. It can help you put off the non-urgent tasks.”

Make sure you keep your list somewhere accessible. If you always have your phone, for example, keep it on your phone.

Achieve “stage one”–get something done!

The Chinese adage of the longest journey starting with a single step has a couple of meanings: First, you launch the project! Second, by starting, you may realize that there are some things you have not planned for in your process. Details of an assignment are not always evident until you    begin the assignment. Another adage is that “perfection is the enemy of good”, especially when it prevents you from starting! Given that you build in review, roughly draft your idea and get going! You will have time to edit and develop later.

Focus on results

Good time management at work means doing high-quality work, not high quantity. I advice you concentrating not on how busy you are, but on results.

“Spending more time on something doesn’t necessarily achieve more,”  “Staying an extra hour at work at the end of the day may not be the most effective way to manage your time.”

Postpone unnecessary activities until the work is done!

Postpone tasks or routines that can be put off until your  work is finished!  This can be the most difficult challenge of time management. As learners we always meet unexpected opportunities that look appealing, then result in poor performance on a test, on a paper, or in preparation for a task. Distracting activities will be more enjoyable later without the pressure of the test, assignment, etc. hanging over your head. Think in terms of pride of accomplishment. Instead of saying “no” learn to say “later”.

Have a lunch break

Lots of people work through their lunch break, As a general rule, taking at least 30 minutes away from your desk will help you to be more effective in the afternoon,” .

“Go for a walk outdoors or, better still, do some exercise,”  “You’ll come back to your desk re-energised, with a new set of eyes and renewed focus.”

Planning your day with a midday break will also help you to break up your work into more manageable chunks.

Use your free time wisely

Think of times when you can study “bits” as when walking, riding the bus, etc. Perhaps you’ve got music to listen to for your course in music appreciation, or drills in language learning? If you are walking or biking to school, when best to listen? Perhaps you are in a line waiting? Perfect for routine tasks like flash cards, or if you can concentrate, to    read or review a chapter. The bottom line is to put your time to good use.

Priorities important tasks

Tasks can be grouped into four categories:

  • urgent and important
  • not urgent but important
  • urgent but not important
  • neither urgent nor important

People with good time management concentrate on “not urgent but important” activities. That way they lower the chances of activities ever becoming “urgent and important”.

“The aim is to learn how to become better at reducing the number of urgent and important tasks. Having to deal with too many urgent tasks can be stressful,”

Learn to Say “No”

Turn off your cell phone and beeper. When someone asks you to do something that you really don’t have time to do, say so, politely, but firmly. And don’t allow yourself to feel guilty.

Don’t Be a Perfectionist

There’s nothing wrong with being ordinary. Perfectionism, otherwise known as paying excessive attention to every detail, important or not, is a kind of procrastination.

Practise the ‘four Ds’

One study found that one in three office workers suffers from email stress. Making a decision the first time you open an email is crucial for good time management.

Emma advises practising the “four Ds”:

  • Delete: you can probably delete half the emails you get immediately.
  • Do: if the email is urgent or can be completed quickly.
  • Delegate: if the email can be better dealt with by someone else.
  • Defer: set aside time later to spend on emails that require longer action.

Reward Yourself

Finally, don’t let any progress, however small, go unrewarded.

“Use your time diary to make decisions about how you want to organize your time better,” said Jasper. “As you make progress in prioritizing and saying ‘no,’ let yourself enjoy that. It doesn’t have to be a big reward, maybe it can be as simple as spending some time by yourself or getting a massage. It’s important to acknowledge and enjoy your success.”

THANK YOU NOTE

Thank you for Reading.

Feel free to come back and leave me a review and feedback how this article challenged your thinking. And I would also like to encourage you to please share the  with friends so that they get the inspiration.

January 16, 2017

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